Every font tells a story

Ebay changes its look

Pictured below is the chunky, feel-good logo of Ebay outside the company’s San Jose Headquarters. Somehow its higgledy-piggledy look echoes the company’s origins. When it all started back in September 1995 by connecting a seller who had a broken laser pointer with a buyer who needed one, it was dominated by individuals selling largely used goods.

Today that has all changed. 260 million searches are performed on the site each day, 70% of the items sold are new, many of them by companies rather than individuals,  and 65% of them are bought at a fixed price. You can read more on the fascinating evolution of the company here. The new logo, apparently, reflects a smarter, more streamlined enterprise. I shall miss the joggly letters, though.

Image: theepochtimes. CLICK for new logo

Sometimes people get terribly sentimental about churches getting ‘too efficient’.  They worry that ideas of sleek presentation and streamlined administration smack too much of the world and that we might just have made room for them at the expense of God’s messy creativity. I don’t believe that needs to be the case. Efficiency and a flexibility borne of love can exist very well side by side.

One thing which has not changed about Ebay is its reliance on feedback. People value their feedback score as if their financial lives depended on it – as often they do. A community which was built on trust where money was sent before goods were seen has continued to have it deep in its DNA.

Communities of trust, with or without joggly letters, should be something which churches know all about.